Categories: GiantStellar

Giant Stellar Stream Spotted around Sombrero Galaxy

The Sombrero galaxy likely merged with a relatively massive galaxy several billions years ago. In a new study published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, astronomers analyzed wide-field deep images of the Sombrero galaxy’s outskirts obtained with a small amateur telescope with the purpose of detecting any tidal structures — such as stellar streams and tails — from the possible ancient merger.

This Hubble image shows the Sombrero galaxy. Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble Heritage Team / STScI / AURA.

The Sombrero galaxy is located approximately 28 million light-years away in the constellation of Virgo.

Also known as Messier 104, M104 or NGC 4594, the galaxy was discovered on May 11, 1781 by the French astronomer Pierre Méchain.

It has a diameter of approximately 49,000 light-years, about 3 times smaller than our Milky Way Galaxy.

“The Sombrero galaxy shows characteristics of both of the dominant types of galaxies in the Universe, the spirals and the ellipticals,” said Dr. David Martínez-Delgado, an astronomer at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía – CSIC, and his colleagues.

“It has spiral arms, and a very large bright central bulge, which makes it look like a hybrid of the two types.”

The recent discovery of extremely metal-rich stars in the halo of the Sombrero galaxy suggested that the galaxy had undergone a recent major merger with a relatively massive galaxy.

“According to the latest cosmological models, large spiral galaxies such as the Milky Way grew by absorbing smaller galaxies, by a sort of galactic cannibalism,” the astronomers said.

“Evidence for this is given by very large structures, the tidal stellar streams, which are observed around them, which are the remains of these satellite galaxies.”

“But the full histories of the majority of these cases are hard to study, because these flows of stars are very faint, and only the remains of the most recent mergers have been detected.”

An artist’s impression of the tidal stream around the Sombrero galaxy. Image credit: Jon Lomberg / Stellar Tidal Stream Survey.

In the new study, the researchers observed the ring-like tidal structure in the inner halo region of the Sombrero galaxy.

“It is remarkable that thanks to these advanced photometric techniques we have been able to do front line science with a Messier object using only an 18-cm-diameter telescope,” said

Read More

News Bot

Share
Published by
News Bot
Tags: GiantStellar

Recent Posts

Japan pitches ‘Society 5.0’ to keep its edge in tech and science

TOKYO -- Japan is showcasing its latest scientific achievements, ranging from sea and air to…

16 mins ago

Tether executives said to face criminal probe into bank fraud

We've detected unusual activity from your computer network To continue, please click the

16 mins ago

BLAKE3 1.0

version 1.0.0 Changes since 0.3.8: Add Hash::from_hex() and implement FromStr for Hash. Implement Display for…

16 mins ago

Why does NBC make it so difficult to watch the Olympics?

I’ve noticed a lot of ads about the Olympics over the last week. Apparently the…

16 mins ago

A 3-quart Instant Pot Duo Nova is just $50, down to the lowest price we’ve seen

Summer 2021 already feels like one of the hottest ever, and turning on the stovetop…

16 mins ago